Work and Comminity among West African Migrant Workers since the Nineteenth Century, by Diane Frost

£14.99
Work and Comminity among West African Migrant Workers since the Nineteenth Century, by Diane Frost
Work and Community among West African Migrant Workers since the Nineteenth Century, by Diane Frost

Book published by Liverpool University Press in 1999, 278 pages. Hardback with Dust Jacket (N5969)

Brand New Book

From the front inside fly leaf: This book brings to light a forgotten history. It tells the story of a group of West Africans, the Kru, who as ship's labourers and seafarers contributed greatly to British colonial trade with West Africa.

The Kru were among the earliest black people to settle in Britain, so this story represents a significant part of British ethnic history; their presence in the period since the Second World War is equally Significant as it represents a continuity in migration between the pre- and post-war periods that can be claimed by few ethnic groups in Britain. The Kru presence today in cities such as Liverpool reflects the historically important trading links with West Africa which led to Kru migration and settlement. Their history of work on board British merchant ships sheds light on the utilisation of colonial labour during the major period of imperial expansion and consolidation.

Few studies of pre-war black communities in Britain have encompassed what this book achieves: the social history of a particular group from their African homeland to Britain. The author uses traditional sources, but also draws on extensive oral accounts of the Kru both in West Africa and Liverpool to bring out their perceptions, beliefs and values. Just as the pre-war Kru presence in Britain has been neglected in historical accounts of immigrants, so too has it been overshadowed by studies of the post-war era of massive New Commonwealth immigration. Dr Frost provides a unique insight into a group whose migration was often transient with time spent in both locations.

Work and Community offers a fascinating excursion into a chapter of British and West African social history that was in danger of being lost for ever. This book will be of interest to academic and general readers concerned with social and economic history, African history, Black studies, Race and Ethnic Studies, Commonwealth and imperial history.
Condition New