The Spurn Gravel Trade - A Conflict between Commerce and Coastal Erosion, by Phil Mathison

£4.99
The Spurn Gravel Trade - A Conflict between Commerce and Coastal Erosion, by Phil Mathison

The Spurn Gravel Trade - A Conflict between Commerce and Coastal Erosion, by Phil Mathison

Booklet published by the author in 2008, 22 pages. A5 size booklet (N6389PE)

This short booklet provides a brief history of the gravel trade that operated in and around Spurn Head on the East Yorkshire coast.

From the opening paragraph: For centuries, buildings in Holderness have used cobbles in their construction. The use of cobbles as a building material is not unique to the area, for in the coastal regions of Norfolk, many houses, churches and walls are made out of the local flint cobbles. The stones are to be seen in several churches, All Saints of Easington and St. Helens of Skeffling being noteworthy. They have also been used in the construction of private dwellings, classic examples being Cliff Farm at Kilnsea, the Warren Cottage at Kilnsea and The Marquis of Granby at Easington. Cobbles were also used in agricultural premises such as the barn at Wilberforce Farm in Skeffling. The Parliamentary Enclosure Acts, which came into effect in Holderness between 1764 and 1840, spurred on the construction of many new cottages and farm buildings in the area. Furthermore, the Brick Taxes, introduced in 1783 and gradually increased until they were finally abolished in 1849, gave a further fillip to the use of cobbles in building construction. The tax was initially 2/6 per thousand bricks, but had reached 5/10 per thousand by 1839. Additionally, between 1839 and 1849, oversize bricks, that is ones over 150 cubic inches volume, were taxed at the higher rate of 10 shillings per thousand! In southern Holderness, most of the stone used originated from the Spurn Point and Kilnsea beaches. Much of the earlier consignments of gravel were manhandled off the shoreline by 'Pannier Men', who employed donkeys with panniers to transport the stone away. However, by the 18th century, boats became the main mode of transport, with the Humber Keel ultimately being the prime mover. Until the Spurn gravel trade ceased, all the boats employed were sail powered.

Condition of the booklet is generally very good. The cover has one or two very minor scuffs but is clean and bright, the staple spine is intact and all pages are clean, intact, unblemished and tightly bound. There is a small price sticker on the rear side cover

Condition New