The Politics of the Poor - The East End of London 1885-1914, by Marc Brodie

£29.99
The Politics of the Poor - The East End of London 1885-1914, by Marc Brodie

The Politics of the Poor - The East End of London 1885-1914, by Marc Brodie

Published by Oxford University Press in 2004, 240 pages. Hardback with Dust Jacket (S8295QWSO)

ISBN: 9780199270552

From the rear side cover: This book is about the political views of the 'classic' poor of London's East End in the late Victorian and Edwardian periods. The residents of this area have been historically characterized as abjectly poor, casually employed, slum dwellers with a poverty-induced apathy toward political solutions interspersed with occasional violent displays of support for populist calls for protectionism, imperialism, or anti-alien agitation. These factors, in combination, have been thought to have allowed the Conservative Party to politically dominate the East End in this period.

Brodie demonstrates that many of these images are wrong. Economic conditions in the East End were not as uniformly bleak as often portrayed. The workings of the franchise laws also meant that those who possessed the vote in the East End were generally the most prosperous and regularly employed of their occupational group. Conservative electoral victories in the East End were not the result of poverty. Instead, it was the support of better-off workers, combined with a general importance in the area of the 'personal' in politics emphasized by local social and workplace structures, which delivered the limited successes that the Conservatives did enjoy.

The condition of the book is generally very good. The dust jacket has one or two very minor scuffs but is clean and bright, the spine is intact, and all pages are clean, intact, unblemished and tightly bound.

Condition New