The Nearest Place That Wasn't Ireland - Early Nineteenth Century Irish Labor Migration, by Ruth-Ann M. Harris

£34.99
The Nearest Place That Wasn't Ireland - Early Nineteenth Century Irish Labor Migration, by Ruth-Ann M. Harris
The Nearest Place That Wasn't Ireland - Early Nineteenth Century Irish Labor Migration, by Ruth-Ann M. Harris

Published by the Iowa State University Press in 1994, 281 pages, Hardback (S8295QWSO)

From the Foreword: In popular imagination mass emigration from Ireland began with the Great Famine of 1846-49. Ruth-Ann Harris here ably draws attention to an important seg­ment of an earlier, unduly neglected exodus. Though pre-Famine emigrants were greatly outnumbered by those of the late 1840s and 1850s, it should be stressed that the outflow of humans from Ireland in the generation between Waterloo and the Famine was vast by contemporary European standards. In those years over one and a half million people, mostly young and single, left Ireland for good. Most made their way to North America, but on the eve of the Famine "the nearest place that wasn't Ireland" contained about half a million of them.

These half-million Irish in Britain were highly concentrated region­ ally: the combined Irish-born populations of London, Manchester, Liv­erpool, and Glasgow accounted for almost one-half of the total. That together those four cities contained as many Irish-born in 1845 as Dublin says much about the nature of Irish participation in the Industrial Revo­lution. The pre-Famine Irish in Britain were highly urbanized, but most of them were country people, bringing many of their rural habits with them. The oft-quoted unsympathetic assessments of Frederick Engels and Thomas Carlyle reflected attitudes widely held among the host pop­ulation. Discrimination in jobs and housing inevitably followed....


The condition of the book is generally very good. The cover boards have one or two very minor scuffs, and some light foxing along the outside page leaves, but the spine is tight and intact, and all pages are clean, intact, unblemished and tightly bound.
Condition New