The British and their Laws in the Eighteenth Century, by David Lemmings

£29.99
The British and their Laws in the Eighteenth Century, by David Lemmings
The British and their Laws in the Eighteenth Century, by David Lemmings

Hardback, published by The Boydell Press in 2005, 260 pages (S8295BWSO)

Law and legal institutions were of huge importance in the governance of Georgian society: legislation expanded the province of administrative authority out of all proportion, while the reach of the common law and its communal traditions of governance diminished, at least outside British North America. But what did the rule of law mean to eighteenth-century people, and how did it connect with changing experiences of law in all their bewildering complexity? This question has received much recent critical attention, but despite widespread agreement about Law's significance as a key to unlock so much which was central to contemporary life, as a whole previous scholarship has only offered a fragmented picture of the Laws in their social meanings and actions. Through a broader-brush approach, The British and their Laws in the Eighteenth Century contributes fresh analyses of law in England and British settler colonies, c. 1680-1830; its expert contributors consider among other matters the issues of participation, central-local relations, and the maintenance of common law traditions in the context of increasing legislative interventions and grants of statutory administrative powers.

The condition of the book is generally very good. The cover has one or two very minor scuffs, and some light wear along the edges and corners, but the spine is tight and intact and all pages are clean, intact, unblemished and tightly bound.
Condition New