The Black Death, edited by Rosemary Horrox

£12.99
The Black Death, edited by Rosemary Horrox

The Black Death, edited by Rosemary Horrox

Book published by Manchester University Press in 1994, 364 pages. Paperback (S5806)

From the rear side cover: From 1348 to 1350 Europe was devastated by an epidemic that left between a third and one half of the population dead. This source book traces, through contemporary writings, the calamitous impact of the Black Death in Europe, with a particular emphasis on its spread across England from 1348 to 1349.

Rosemary Horrox surveys contemporary attempts to explain the plague, which was universally regarded as an expression of divine vengeance for the sins of humankind. Moralists all had their particular targets for criticism. However, this emphasis on divine chastisement did not preclude attempts to explain the plague in medical or scientific terms. Also, there was a widespread belief that human agencies had been involved, and such scapegoats as foreigners, the poor and Jews were all accused of poisoning wells. The final section of the book charts the social and psychological impact of the plague, and its effect on the late-medieval economy.

Condition of the book is generally very good. The cover has one or two minor scuffs and creases, and some nibbling along the edges, and the front cover curves gently upwards, but the spine is intact and all pages are intact, unblemished and tightly bound. The book has a faint musty smell where it has been stored, and a few page corners have been bent over

Condition New