Some English Yeomanry Sabretaches, by William Y Carman

£6.99
Some English Yeomanry Sabretaches, by William Y Carman

Some English Yeomanry Sabretaches, by William Y Carman

Published by the Military Historical Society in 1987, 48 pages. Booklet - c.14cm by 21.5cm (N6455)

This booklet provides a fascinating account of English yeomanry sabretaches. A Sabretache is a flat bag (like a large pouch) that was worn suspended from the belt of a cavalry officer, and this booklet is illustrated throughout with lots of black and white photographs of actual Sabretaches from various Yeomanry regiments.

From the introduction: Although there might be earlier examples to be found in Europe, sabretaches were worn by British cavalry in the first years of the nineteenth century. Originally the sabretache developed or descended from the medieval purse or pouch and became an useful accessory to the light cavalry man whose nether garments were too tight to allow pockets. The 'tasche' (German for pocket or pouch) was attached by narrow straps to the same belt as the sabre or 'sabel', This pocket normally had a stiffened front with a folding or pleated bag or pocket behind which could hold orders, documents or other items needed by the cavalryman. Being stiff, it could act as a writing-pad while still seated on the horse. The front was a suitable place on which to carry devices to indicate sovereign, commander or regiment. As it was mainly a part of the officer's equipment, there was not much need for other ranks to have a sabretache but it was useful for non­ commissioned officers and warrant officers, in which case an inferior article was employed, usually a black leather version. The full dress embroidered 'tache could be an expensive item and many yeomanry officers were not in a hurry to purchase one. However it was usually a very showey object with the elaborate embroidered and special wide lace and some rich regiments had beautiful examples of the embroiderer's and lacemen's art. There were of course simpler leather examples which were much cheaper and could be used freely on undress occasions...

Condition of the booklet is generally ok. The cover has one or two minor scuffs and blemishes, but the staple spine is intact, and all pages are intact, unblemished and tightly bound. There is some light roll and undulations along the left hand edge of the booklet.

Condition New