Drumming in the English Civil Wars, by Michael Pfeil

£8.99
Drumming in the English Civil Wars, by Michael Pfeil

Drumming in the English Civil Wars, by Michael Pfeil

Booklet published by Stuart Press in 1997, 36 pages. A5 size booklet (N6818)

From the introduction: About 30 years after the Norman conquest the crusaders of the first crusade found that their infidel enemies - the saracens, as they called all muslims (Iatin for arab)- were using drums for military purposes. Some of the crusaders who were lucky enough to survive brought a number of captured drums to England, they were calling them nakers after the french naccaire, a corruption of the arab word naggara; or tabours, a smaller version which originated in Persia. They adopted the saracen fashion of having a servant beating a tabour or a naker as part of their personal retinue. To understand this a bit better we must be aware that then people were not exposed to anything near the noise pollution we endure today and that anything noisy could be trusted to make an impression.

And so tabourers beat with great effect at the great feast held by Edward I held in Westminster Hall in 1306. Edward III went one step further, he appointed a tabourer into the royal household and, for the first time on British soil, brought them into play during a battle. A ballad describes their use during Edward's victory over the Scots at Hallidown Hill; he did so alongside well orchestrated cries and with the purpose of striking terror into the foe, a kind of 14th century psychological warfare. The noise of the drums was not only meant to demoralize the Scots but also to strengthen the resolve of the English. As long as the fighters could hear the drums beating victory could still be theirs if they fought on resolutely. And here closes the circle because this is exactly the same way in which more than 100 years earlier the saracens had used their drums....

The condition of the booklet is generally very good. The cover has one or two minor scuffs, but the staple spine is intact, and all pages are intact, unblemished and tightly bound. There is a small price sticker on the rear side cover