Army Wheels in Detail - British Anti-Tank Guns in the Czechoslovak Independent Armoured Brigade Group during World War II, by Petr Brojo

£16.99
Army Wheels in Detail - British Anti-Tank Guns in the Czechoslovak Independent Armoured Brigade Group during World War II, by Petr Brojo

Army Wheels in Detail - British Anti-Tank Guns in the Czechoslovak Independent Armoured Brigade Group during World War II, by Petr Brojo

Booklet published by Capricorn in 2016, 44 pages. Square(ish) booklet - c.22cm by 24cm (N6333X1)

All text in English and Czech

This book covers British Army Anti-Tank guns (including the Ordnance Quick Fire 2 pounder gun, 6 pounder gun and 17 pounder gun) that were used by the Czechoslovak Independent Armoured Brigade Group during the Second World War (CIABG, as it was known, was an armoured unit of expatriate Czechoslovaks organised and equipped by the United Kingdom during the war)

From the introduction: The Ordnance Quick Fire 2-pounder gun was was designed by Vickers as an anti-tank cannon and a 40mm tank gun. In October 1935 Vickers presented new platform design that was accepted as Ordnance QF 2-pounder Mark IX on Carriage Mark I (in this case Vickers was faster than the R&D team of Woolwich Arsenal). A limited number of guns were produced in 1936. The platform/base of the gun was an innovative three legged design. In transport position one of the legs was used to tow the gun with the other two legs stowed. In deployed position all three legs were placed on the ground and the wheels lifted off the ground. Woolwich Arsenal continued to improve the design and following tests adopted an improved Mark II platform that was better than that of Vickers. The platform was conceptually similar to Mark I, with the exception of the wheels that had to be removed when the gun was in deployed position. This platform was also later prouced by Vickers. This unique design provided good stability to the weapon as well as 360 degree range, which provided rather quick deployment from transport position. The disadvantage of the 2 pounder were higher profile and heavier weight which was almost double when compared to the German PaK 36. Despite these disadvantages, the gun was successfully used during the 1940French and North African campaigns.

The first use of the gun mounted on a tank was the Cruiser Tank Mk I main gun. This made the gun the most widely used British gun at the beginning of the war. Later on and till the end of the War the gun continued to be used as a primary weapon of medium and heavy armored vehicles. Universal carrier and Loyd carrier were the primary artillery tractors used to tow the gun. The gun was also used on the light CMP (Canadian Military Pattern truck) and Morris trucks. With the thickening of tank armor the penetration of the gun proved as further insufficient and as of 1942 the gun started to be gradually replaced by an Ordnance Quick Fire 6-pounder gun.....

The book is packed full with colour and black and white photographs of the guns (many being close up shots of various parts of the guns themselves), and their are explanatory captions to each of the photo's - with all text in both English and Czech.

Condition of the booklet is generally excellent. The covers are clean and bright, the staple spine is intact and all pages are clean, intact, unblemished and tightly bound.

Condition New