A Shipyard Town - The Story of Barrow in the 20th Century, by Bryn Trescatheric

£13.99
A Shipyard Town - The Story of Barrow in the 20th Century, by Bryn Trescatheric

A Shipyard Town - The Story of Barrow in the 20th Century, by Bryn Trescatheric

Published by the author & Barrow Dock Museum in 2007, 62 pages. Large A4 size softback (N6319X1)

This book provides a fascinating history of Barriw-in-Furness during the last century, and is illustrated throughout with several black and white photographs....

From the introduction: This book is the story of Barrow in the twentieth century. Hopefully it will stand alone as a lucid account, but the following lines will help set the scene. In the 1840s Barrow was still a village, with a population of little more than 150. The coming of the Furness Railway (1846) and the founding of an ironworks (1859) transformed Barrow's fortunes. By 1861 Barrow's population had grown to 3,135; in 1871 it was 18,911 and by 1881 it had reached 47,259. A town was invented - terraced streets, shops, churches and chapels, civic buildings. The engine of Barrow's growth was the iron and steelworks at Hindpool. Barrow was a Steel Town before it became a Shipyard Town. The Hindpool works was one of the largest in Europe and specialised in steel rails for the railways of Britain, America and the Empire. Social and political life was controlled by a few men whose names live on in Barrow's srreets and buildings - Ramsden, Schneider, Fell. The largest landowner and investor was the 7th Duke of Devonshire, head of the Cavendish family. Shipbuilding had modest beginnings and it was not until the twentieth century that it began to rival steelmaking...

The condition of the book is generally excellent. The covers are clean and bright, the spine is tight and intact, and all pages are clean, intact, unblemished and tightly bound. Please note there is a small price sticker on the rear side cover

Condition New