A History of the Imperial Service Troops of Native States, by Brigr-General Stuart Beatson

£29.99
A History of the Imperial Service Troops of Native States, by Brigr-General Stuart Beatson
A History of the Imperial Service Troops of Native States, by Brigr-General Stuart Beatson, subtitled 'With a short sketch of events in each State, which have led to their employment in subordinate co-operation with the supreme government'

Book published by Sang-E-Meel (Lahore) in 2006, 180 pages. Hardback (N4533OSWSOU6)

Originally published in 1903, this book is a complete facsimilie of the earlier edition, and provides an excellent and detailed account of the structure and organisation of the Imperial Service Troops system as it existed in British India in the early 1900's. The author compiled a short chapter on each of the twenty-three state forces which were participating in the scheme at that time.

The Imperial Service Troops were forces raised by the princely states of the British Indian Empire, and these troops were available for service alongside the Indian Army when such service was requested by the British government. At the beginning of the 20th century, their total numbers were about 18,000 men, and they were largely equipped with the same equipment as soldiers in the regular Indian Army. Although their numbers were relatively small, the Imperial Service Troops saw service in China and East Africa between 1900 and 1910, and later saw action in the First World War...

The condition of the book is generally ok. The cover boards have some minor scuffs and blemishes, and light bumping and wear along the edges and corners, and there is a small nic/tear in the outside cover in the bottom left corner. The spine is tight and intact, and all pages are intact, unblemished and tightly bound. Their is some light foxing to the outside page leaves, and further light bubbling to the inside pages throughout. There is a small bookshop stamp (from Islamabad in Pakistan!) on the first inside page, and as is usual for books published in India and Pakistan, the paper used is thinner than we are used to.

Condition New